Upcoming Audubon Birding Events

color in winterFebruary 17-20 Great Backyard Bird Count Bird watchers of all ages count birds to create a real time snapshot of where birds are. To learn more and participate in this citizen science project, visit their website at: http://gbbc.birdcount.org

March 19 – Mississippi River Waterfowl Field Trip. Dan Jackson will lead a waterfowl viewing field trip on Saturday, Meet at 8 a.m. at the entrance to Goose Island. We will head south and look for waterfowl and other
early migrants as far as Genoa or Rush Creek and finish around noon. The trip is free and open to everyone.child with chickadee winter

April 8 – Annual Midwest Crane Count – 5:30 a.m.-7:30 a.m. The Annual Midwest Cr
ane Count is one of the largest citizen-based wildlife surveys in the world. One of the primary purposes of the Crane Count is to monitor the abundance and distribution of cranes in th
e Upper Midwest. The Crane Count is organized by county in Wisconsin and portions of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan, and Minnesota. Scott Puchalski will coordinate La Crosse County this year. Other area counties are also looking for volunteers.

Past participants will receive an email from Scott in early April inviting you to participate again. If you have not counted before and would like to join the count, please send Scott an email at: obsidianblur@gmail.com and he will help you get started. More information on the Crane Count can be found at: www.savingcranes.org.

 

Christmas Bird Count Results for La Crosse 2016

The La Crosse Audubon Club has released its count for Christmas 2016…  This year, we had 27 reports from 29 available sections and we also had 41 feeder counts. Conditions were poor, but we still were able to find just over 12,000 birds of 66 species. That included some great species that are normally unusual for this count. The best were a Rose-breasted Grosbeak and White- winged Scoters, but other unusual species included Northern Saw-whet Owl, Hooded Merganser, Red- breasted Merganser, Winter Wren, Northern Harrier, Fox Sparrow, Trumpeter Swans, and Golden Eagles. Great results on a tough day to count!! Effort-wise, we had 48 section counters and 45 feeder counters who contributed over 330 hours of effort. That is truly impressive and I want to say thanks again for your help with this year’s La Crosse Area Christmas Bird Count!!!

Eagle Watches Celebrate the Come-back Birds

Feature story by Pat Middleton may not be used without written permission from Great River Publishing

Birders craving an excuse to “head on down to the river” during the months of December through March, take note! The major concentrations of American bald eagles in the entire continental U.S. now winter near the open waters at the Locks and Dams of the Mississippi River.

From Red Wing, Minnesota, to Reelfoot Lake, Tennessee, organized public eagle watches are celebrating one of our nation’s brightest environmental come-backs.

The American Bald Eagle is nothing if not resilient. In the 1960’s Rachel Carson drew attention to their devastating decline with her report that on the entire Mississippi River her counters found only 59 eagles. The effects of DDT, habitat destruction, and human persecution had taken a toll on a population, which once counted many thousands on the Upper River. The few remaining birds tended to winter near Union Dam in Keokuk, Iowa, where fish stunned by the turbulence and aeration of the water offered eagles easy foraging. Opposite Keokuk, along the Illinois shore, large trees, sheltered by the Iowa bluffs provided excellent perching and roosting sites.

Although DDT was banned in 1972, it wasn’t until 1985 that people started to notice a true increase in the eagle population. Pat Schlarbaum, at the time a Fish & Wildlife Specialist with the Iowa DNR, thought it was time to celebrate.

“The Keokuk Eagle Watch Days were really instigated as a celebration of the success of our wintering population of eagles,” Pat says. “We had no idea the notion would catch on along the entire river. The Keokuk Watch now features nearly 500 wintering eagles, volunteer spotters, donated binoculars and spotting scopes. It’s exciting enough to draw viewers from around the nation. In addition, the public lectures and presentations by DNR personnel, volunteers from Raptor Rehab Centers, and the Army Corps of Engineers have provided our agencies with an outstanding opportunity to educate the general public about raptors, our birds of prey. Volunteers bring not only live eagles, but owls, hawks, and even peregrine falcons to the presentations.”  (continued below, Click CONTINUE READING)

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Tundras Arriving; but Later and in Lower Numbers

Thank you to my favorite photographer for his first Tundra Swan alert:  

“After a long and arduous wait the Tundra Swans have finally arrived in number on Pool 8 of the Mississippi River. (Usually I am busy photographing along the MS during the whole month of November, but not this year.)

Click this blue link to Read Alan’s Swan report for 2016.

Enter Swans in the Search Box at the upper right to pull up historical arrival dates back to 2008!  Interested in Eagles? Enter Eagles in Search Box… or anything else you are curious about!!

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Tundra Swans Arrive

A few days ago, my Tundra Swan search on the Mississippi River south of La Crosse came up empty. Today, small groups are out there south of Goose Island and most likely Brownsville, MN,  as well.

If you spot Swans, let us know!!

For those who might be interested in a guided Swan watch, the La Crosse Audubon Society is offering a Swan watch on Sunday Nov 13 at noon. Here is the full story.

We will be holding our annual Tundra Swan field trip on Sunday November 13 at Noon. We will meet at the Kwik Trip in La Crescent. It is the one at the only stop lights in La Crescent on the corner of Hwy 14 and 16. The address is 319 south 3rd. We will be parking on 3rd street behind the Kwik trip and be leaving from there and making a few stops before the final destination being the Brownsville overlook. We normally go about 2 hours, but as always your free to come and go as you please. 

 

Indian Summer in Full Glory… Come Out to Play!

Today and the week to follow is a great time to explore the coulees, streams and river valleys, bluffs and trails of the Driftless Region of Western Wisconsin, NW Illinois, SE Minnesota and and NE Iowa!

Pelicans are mobbing up into great clusters of pristine white on the Mississippi River. Bald Eagles are abundant… we saw several pairs just hanging out in nests, enjoying the day as much as we were!  Can’t say I’ve seen Tundra Swans as yet…which is fine with me as they remind us a frozen river is not far behind!!

The river has finally dropped a bit, so fishing has picked up. Fishing Barges and boat landings we saw were busy.

The Fishing repFun for the whole familyort from Clements Fishing Barge: “November 3rd: Fishing has been pretty good for walleye and sauger.  White bass are done and the perch scarce.  Most fish are coming in on minnows or hair jigs.  Guys are still using 1 oz jigs, water is still higher than normal, but fish are in.”

Enjoy the weekend!

SHOP Great River Publishing/Great River Arts

Welcome!  IT’S A GREAT RIVER! and a GREAT GIFT… for your favorite Mississippi or Missouri River Buff, Retiree, or Armchair Traveler!

 Order Securely Online TODAY!

 Please visit our new Great River Shopping Cart for Artisan maps, Historic Maps, and Custom Designed Maps by Map Artist, Lisa Middleton. Click Image
below and enter key word in SEARCH BOX. Several Hundred maps!!

Pike's map of the upper Mississippi River with Eagle


We believe we have the most extensive collection of eye-popping interpretive river cards available!!

Please call 888-255-7726!

Books, Books!

Click Image below to see Mississippi River Guides!

Discover! America's Great River Road is the indispensible guidebook to the Upper Mississippi River ... heritage, natural history and recreation. Since 1987!   

 “We just traveled 5829 miles along the Mississippi River; from Baton Rouge, LA to Lake Itasca, MN up thwest side of the river and back down to Interstate 80 on the east side. Your DISCOVER! guidebooks are wonderful. We are going back next year to go the rest of the way to the end in the Gulf of Mexico. Thanks!”    ~ Faith

Click Image below to see ALL our Steamboat and Railroad Books!

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Happy Holidays to All!
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Historic River Ribbon Maps Tell a LONG Story!


Mississippi River Ribbon Maps
Ribbon map with Winder, The image is printed on matte archival photographic paper with no border. The paper measures 60 inches on the longest side and is variable on the shorter side according to the shape of the photograph.

Story is adapted by Pat Middleton, www.greatriver.com, from an article by Bob Mullen, for The Paddlewheel newsletter published by the Golden Eagle River Museum, St. Louis, Missouri

(Left) Authentic Historic Ribbon map with Winder, sized for use on the boat. 


 

Imagine a map of the Mississippi River that shows all of the cities and towns along the river and all the landings where a steamboat might stop.

Make the map about three inches wide and in one continuous strip showing the entire river from the Gulf of Mexico to its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota. If you imagined correctly, you would have a map that is about eleven feet in length, like a long streamer or ribbon. Now roll up the map to a couple of inches in diameter and put into a wooden cylindrical container that can easily fit into your pocket!

 

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Drainage Map of the Mississippi River and its Tributaries. Some Facts and Figures

QUESTIONS! QUESTIONS!
For Jack, who wants to know more about all the tributaries of the Mississippi River: how many there are,  their names, and how long they are!

NPS.gov watershed tributaries

There are some 250 tributaries of the Mississippi which drain a total area of more than 1,247,000 square miles–one third of the nation’s landmass–extending from the Allegheny Mountains in the east to the Rocky Mountains in the west!

Remember the Mississippi River Flood of 1993? It wasn’t just the Mississippi River flooding that wreaked havoc, it was that all those tributaries flooded as well! At one point, the volume of water flowing past St. Louis was eleven times the volume of Niagara Falls!!

We start here with quick facts on the Mississippi River and several navigable tributaries! Please follow links for a little more depth of historical interest and to see our collection of hand-painted maps!

The Mississippi River, from its source at Lake Itasca in Minnesota, to the Gulf of Mexico, is approximately 2,348 miles long. The combined reach of the Missouri-Mississippi Rivers is 3,741 miles–a length exceeded only by the Amazon and Nile rivers. The Mississippi River has shortened by several hundred miles since the days of Mark Twain. Even today it varies 30-50 miles each year.

The widest navigable part of the Mississippi is Lake Pepin, on the Upper Mississippi, where it is approximately 2 miles wide. The average current flows from 1.2 miles per hour nearer Lake Itasca, and about 3 mi per hour nearer New Orleans.

Our Mississippi River Ribbon Map has been a best-selling Gift for many years. Lisa now offers her own custom ribbon map designs of both the OHIO RIVER and the Missouri River. Please click on any map image for more info on the map or the tributary. Or PHONE 888-255-7726 to order any map. Mention you saw it on greatriver.com for a one time 10% discount!   Click on map images for more info on the tributaries.

 

 

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