Help Needed…Mississippi Valley Conservancy Bird Survey

Birders! Mississippi Valley Conservancy needs your HELP! We are seeking volunteers to look and listen for birds to help determine presence or absence of declining bird species on different sites throughout southwest Wisconsin. Volunteers essentially would go to a Nice Vertical Hummersite in early morning and make a list of any birds seen and/or heard. Sites vary between MVC nature preserves or private lands MVC is working to protect. These bird lists provide invaluable information will help to guide our restoration activities and prioritize sites with breeding populations of declining birds. If interested, email Abbie Church, MVC Conservation Director at achurch@mississippivalleyconservancy.org with your preference for habitat (forest, wetland, grassland); geographical interest (La Crosse County, Monroe County, anywhere, etc) and availability. We’re hoping to schedule site visits throughout May. Sites include woodlands, grasslands, and pastures in Trempealeau, La Crosse, Jackson, Monroe, Crawford, and Vernon Counties.

Mississippi Valley Conservancy | PO Box 2611, 1309 Norplex Drive, Suite 9, La Crosse, WI 54601 | 608.784.3606 ext 2 | www.MississippiValleyConservancy.org

Fabulous Fishing Wanes with High Water

Some 2-3 weeks ago we were are out along the Mississippi and marveled at the number of fishing boats clustered below the dams. I’m starting to see pix that explain the boats! Apparently at this time, with higher water, the perch have cooled, So walleye and sauger are more common. But it sure IS tantalizing!! For updates on fishing, please check our fishing category or the Genoa fishing barge. Photos courtesy Mark Clements.

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“First Day” Sightings of Sandhill Cranes along Pool 8, Since 1987

Our farm lies perched above a broad wetland valley. Back in the mid-80s I heard something we had never heard before, the unison calls of a pair of nesting sandhill cranes. When it was verified by our local conservation warden and by the University of Wisconsin, we could claim to have reported the first nesting pair of sandhill cranes in the La Crosse area in a very long time.

     Since then, our neighborhood has maintain a spring “Crane Watch.”   Some of those dates and comments appear below. For more recent years, please use the SEARCH button to see stories about the cranes! The quote at the end of this piece is one of my favorites from Aldo Leopold.

3/2/2011 “Eight Sandhill Cranes arrived TODAY, making their earliest arrival in our records. Ground is still frozen with several inches of crusty snow. ”

March 15, 2009  “Bitter cold night as late as 03/13/09. So cranes waited until we hit the 50 degree mark two days later.

March 12, 2008 “3 Sandhill cranes fly over Goose Island near La Crosse.
March 13, 2008  A Single crane flies, calling, over Coon Creek near Stoddard.   Lots of melting snow in the valley. Temp of 56.7 degrees. ”                           


March 11, 2007 “Sandhill Cranes on the islands off Goose Island Park south of La Crosse. Temps in upper 40s, two weeks after record snowfalls in Western Wisconsin, so lots of snow on the ground. March 12 the cranes are reported along Coon Creek and other valleys off the Upper Mississippi River.”                               

Feb 23, 2005  (a good two weeks earlier than normal!)
March 15, 2003
March 13, 2002
March 13, 2001
    March 16, 1999
March 1, 1998
March 10, 1997
March 13, 1996
March 18, 1993
April 4, 1992
March 9, 1988
March 17, 1987

Excerpt from A Sand County Almanac by Aldo Leopold

“The sadness discernible in some marshes arises, perhaps in their once having harbored cranes. Now they stand humbled, adrift in history.

“Someday, perhaps in the very process of our benefactions, perhaps in the fullness of geologic time, the last crane will trumpet his farewell and spiral skyward from the great marsh.

“High out of the clouds will fall the sound of hunting horns, the baying of the phantom pack, the tinkle of little bells, and then a silence never to be broken, unless perchance in some far away pasture of the milky way.”

–Aldo Leopold, Marshland Elegy

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Feb 27 … Ice is disappearing, Eagles abundant, the First Sandhill arrives!

craneslandThe 50 degree day this weekend made for a great trip along the river. We found the downstream sides of the Locks to be crowded with fishing boats. 38 below the Genoa dam.

Bald Eagles clustered… sometimes as many as 12 in close proximity… fishing along the edge of melted ice sheets. My guess is that as the ice melts, fish carcasses are released to make an easy meal for our favorite scavengers! At one spot, I quickly counted 12 eagles and then left uncounted a much larger cluster of fishing and flying eagles just beyond.

Prairie du Chien had their annual Eagle Days this coming weekend, March 5, .Ferryville offers theirs. Eagle days are an excellent time for visitors to have access to expert guides in accessible spots in our small town communities!

It was hard to imagine that our Sandhill Cranes would let a 50 degree day slip by without making a run for Wisconsin, so we made it home by 5 to form a welcoming committee. Sure enough, a single crane came in by 5:15 pm. Like the last crane to leave cranesthe valley in October, this first arrival was mostly focused on finding out who might already have arrived. Its calls were constant as it moved eastward from the river, but no responses as yet. By March 13, most of our local birds will be settled in and claiming their nests.

I have to say this was the first time in 15 or 20 years of crane watching that I have been so confident the cranes would show up that I have literally set up a lawnchair to wait for them!! What a wonderful river valley to call home! You can find a HISTORY of Sandhill Crane arrival dates I’ve recorded in a near-by post. Use the SEARCH option to find previous posts on Eagles, Pelicans, and Sandhill Cranes along the Mississippi River!

DAILY U.S.G.S. FLOOD ALERT MAP

arrow-clip-art-Arrow-clip-art-16CURRENT RIVER FLOOD ALERTS

Below is the USGS interactive map that provides REAL TIME info on which Rivers in the US are cresting. The map below is accurate every day. Black Triangles indicate flood stage. Looking to compare stats with the Flood of 1993? CLICK HERE.

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See more interactive maps by clicking the category in the list to right: INTERACTIVE MAPS

Answer to Dead Birds and Christmas Joy… and the story of the Christmas Bird Count!

So what possessed Victorians to send Christmas and other greetings with illustrations of dead birds? One such card reads, “Sweet messenger of calm decays in peace Divine.”

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It may hark back to an archaic English celebration of St. Stephens Feast Day, on Dec 26, when folks went out and killed a robin… or a wren… and saved the feathers for good luck. Often young boys in the village would visit homes and exchange feathers for a treat!

During medieval times, Dec 26 was the only day when a wren, considered sacred, could be killed. In fact, “King Wren” was paraded through the village in its death box…  which may actually date back further to a Druid tradition when the priest-king of the tribe was sacrificed to avert disaster for the tribe. Over time, English robins replaced the wren as the symbol.

But were the Victorians really connecting dead birds to tribal druid kings? According to Chan Robbins from an Audubon Science video on Vimeo, another Christmas tradition evolved in New England before the turn of the century which involved birds and small mammals.

The townsmen on Christmas Day engaged in a holiday tradition known as the Christmas “Side Hunt”: They would choose sides and go afield with their guns to shoot as many birds and species as they could that afternoon. The resultant pile of feathered (and furred) quarry were sorted by species and counted. The team which had shot the most, won.

Conservation was in its beginning stages around in that era, and many observers and scientists were becoming concerned about declining bird populations. Beginning on Christmas Day 1900, ornithologist Frank M. Chapman, an early officer in the nascent Audubon Society, proposed a new holiday tradition-a “Christmas Bird Census”-that would count birds during the holidays rather than hunt them.

So began the Christmas Bird Count. Thanks to the inspiration of Chapman and the enthusiasm of twenty-seven dedicated birders, twenty-five Christmas Bird Counts were held that day. Those original 27 Christmas Bird Counters tallied around 90 species on all the counts combined. So there is the answer to why we have an annual bird count in the middle of our northern winter!

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English robins continue to festoon modern Christmas cards, though they are alive and nestled among poinsiettas and berries!!

With that, I would like to wish all of you a Very Merry Christmas season!

Pat

 

Dead Birds and Christmas Joy?!

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What could possibly be the connection Victorians saw  between dead birds and Christmas?!

Please comment! Come back before Dec 19 to see my tie-in!

 

“It is an illustration of the song/nursery rhyme, ‘Who killed Cock Robin?’ Not very christmassy, I agree.”

“It also might have something to do with the Wren King parades in the UK that happen around Dec 26. They used to parade with a real dead bird, but I believe they use a fake bird now. Maybe some connection…image

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Birding POPS at Brownsville, MN

My favorite birder and bird photographer has posted his report on Pool 8, below. According to Alan this is the time to see Tundra swans up close at the wayside south of Brownsville! Lots of ducks, Hawks, eagles, and Pelicans. Check in south of Goose Island on Wisconsin’s Hyw 35 for more of the same!

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Greetings!

Things are finally picking up a bit on Pool 8 of the Mississippi with Tundra Swans now in close viewing distance from the Brownsville FWS Overlook. Of course, besides the swans there are plenty of other waterfowl to see as well as pelicans, eagles and other raptors.

My suggestion is that if you are thinking about going to Brownsville, this is the weekend to do it. Next week looks rainy (Mon-Wed) and then look out… It looks like our first taste of winter will be on our doorstep Thu/Fri and into next week. Looking at the computer models, they are consistently showing sharply colder temps and some of the models are showing measurable snow. The cold snap looks to last 5 days or so before moderation once again. Will it be enough to freeze up the river? Could be… or maybe not. If so, say good-bye to the show at Brownsville.

Alan Stankevitz

i wishicouldfly.com